Growth

See also: Progression

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“The Savior’s creation of the earth, under the direction of His Father, was a mighty act of nurturing. He provided a place for us to grow and develop faith in His atoning power. Faith in Jesus Christ and His Atonement is the ultimate place of healing and hope, growth and purpose. All of us need a spiritual and physical place of belonging. We, sisters of all ages, can create this; it is even a holy place.”

Neill F. Marriott, Second Counselor in the Young Women General Presidency
What Shall We Do?”April 2016 General Conference

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“Emma Smith said, ‘I desire the Spirit of God to know and understand myself, that I might be able to overcome whatever of tradition or nature that would not tend to my exaltation.’ We must develop bedrock faith in the Savior’s gospel and move forward, empowered by temple covenants, toward exaltation.”

Neill F. Marriott, Second Counselor in the Young Women General Presidency
What Shall We Do?”April 2016 General Conference

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“One of those small things, I have learned, is that I must find the time to fill my own spiritual reservoir each day. It’s tempting to make a massive list of my failings and then to work at them, as a friend of mine says, as though I am ‘killing snakes.’ Self-improvement may seem a kind of work project, but it is—at heart—a change of heart. When we women struggle to keep up with life—raising children, providing necessities, attending school, dealing with issues of age or ill health—our own spirituality often ends up at the bottom of our long ‘to do’ lists.”

Kathleen H. Hughes, First Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Out of Small Things,” October 2004 General Conference

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“One of the miracles of the Restoration of the gospel and the organization of the Church in these latter days is that the plan allows growth and change to come to the members. We each have available to us the experience that will help us change—to become spiritually mature. Through our own repeated efforts, our faith can become a reality.”

Janette Hales Beckham, Young Women General President
Making Faith a Reality,” October 1997 General Conference

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“We are promised…that we grow spiritually as we believe in the words of those who know, those whose faith has produced the capacity to endure and to move forward. Faith is power in us and gives us the ability to do.”

Aileen H. Clyde, Second Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Confirmed in Faith,” October 1996 General Conference

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“Sisters, we need to keep growing. Part of our mortal responsibility is to increase in learning and wisdom. We need to use the two oars of study and faith so that our boats will not be swamped by the storms of life. We need to teach our children to use these same oars. Let’s encourage them to value education and to increase in learning and wisdom through study and faith.”

Chieko N. Okazaki, First Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Rowing Your Boat,” October 1994 General Conference

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“As we concentrate on pleasing the Lord rather than others and continue to work hard, doing the things we don’t know how to do yet, we will experience personal growth. We will increase our confidence in Heavenly Father and his Son, Jesus Christ. This faith assures us that in the end, we will not only survive but we will know great joy and happiness.”

Virginia H. Pearce, First Counselor, Young Women General Presidency
Fear,” October 1992 General Conference

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“My whole hope in speaking to you about gospel knowledge of our individual importance to our Heavenly Father and our Savior is that it will build our confidence in our own ability to make good decisions that will help us grow spiritually.”

Aileen H. Clyde, Second Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Confidence through Conversion,” October 1992 General Conference

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“Growing up does not take place without a work effort. Not long ago, my youngest daughter came home and said her bishop had asked her to be a Sunday School teacher. She said, ‘I just don’t feel like a Sunday School teacher.’ I said, ‘You aren’t yet, Mary, but you will be.’ Growing up involves developing our potential. Heavenly Father is counting on each one of us. Confidence will grow quietly from within as we work and gain experience.”

Janette C. Hales, Young Women General President
You Are Not Alone,” April 1992 General Conference

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“Have you ever been told you are just like your mother, or you have your father’s smile, or all of your family have the same color of eyes? The physical characteristics that we inherit from our parents are obvious. The spiritual characteristics we inherit from our heavenly parents have to be developed. You have been born with all the godlike gifts that Christ has. They are within you, but you have to choose to cultivate and develop them. Spiritual growth doesn’t just happen without our best efforts.”

Elaine L. Jack, Second Counselor, Young Women General Presidency
Identity of a Young Woman,” October 1989 General Conference

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“Just as the fragile bud contains all of the essential elements to develop into a lovely plant or flower, so does each child come to us with the potential for individual self-fulfillment of his eternal destiny. In both instances, in order that what is inside can be fully developed, it must be nurtured from the outside. In nature, plants require light, water, air, and nutrients to thrive. The human spirit thrives on love, knowledge of its origin, and teachings of a spiritual nature. It is important that we provide a favorable environment for spiritual growth and the peace that will accompany it.”

Michaelene P. Grassli, Primary General President
Children at Peace,” October 1988 General Conference

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“As we observe the process of natural growth, we become acutely aware of certain eternal principles upon which all growth is predicated. First, growth is the expected norm. It’s the divine challenge given to each soul as it enters mortality. Our Heavenly Father expects us to use the great gift of life to enjoy and to celebrate this central truth. Because we have life, we can grow and develop and do some things on earth we cannot do anywhere else.”

Dwan J. Young, Primary General President
An Invitation to Grow,” April 1982 General Conference

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“Only God’s children have the capacity to direct their own growth. This means that we can use this time on earth to bring optimum growth and development because we have the power to make choices. It’s not enough just to grow. Even the weeds and the biblical tares can do that. It is expected of us that we will shape our growth so that we will not be like Topsy (in Uncle Tom’s Cabin) who ‘just growed,’ but rather we will successfully negotiate the bumps and curves by enlarging upon our talents, by disciplining ourselves, so that our mortal experience brings us toward greater and greater mastery of those characteristics which make us worthy of association with the Divine.”

Dwan J. Young, Primary General President
An Invitation to Grow,” April 1982 General Conference

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“Be aware that growth is a process. It is never fully and finally achieved; it’s just a steady picking our way upward along the mountain path. Ultimately the process requires hope and faith. We have potential for development much like the seed Alma so eloquently described which, when tended and nurtured, will burst into full flower. Once the preparation is completed, full growth is realized only when we have the faith to venture forth.”

Dwan J. Young, Primary General President
An Invitation to Grow,” April 1982 General Conference

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“A transition may prove an opportunity for spiritual physical, intellectual and psychological development—or it can become a time of serious deterioration. The way is new and often difficult. It takes a great deal of courage and sometimes support from others to make a transition a time of growth.”

Barbara B. Smith, Relief Society General President
Relief Society in Times of Transition,” October 1981 General Conference

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“The Women in this Church need to be prepared—personally prepared—first, to stem the tide of error inundating the world, threatening families, short-circuiting the power of individuals. Second, though we have great men to lead us, we need to know for ourselves what is error and what is truth so that we can make valid value judgments. So much depends on this. Third, we need to grow and develop so that we are prepared to contribute. We each have a mighty errand to do. It may or may not include marriage and motherhood at this time, but ours is the errand of influence.

“Remember, sisters, a woman doesn’t have to stay in the house to be in the home. Neither does a woman need to leave her home to extend her influence to others. We will, however, be more effective on our errand if we have studied the gospel, developed our skills, and reached up and beyond our own first associations. The sooner we start, the sooner we’ll soar. Growth is gradual. Time is so swift—crickets call, then Christmas comes. One day a little girl—next day a woman. ‘Sunrise, sunset,’ the nostalgic song reminds us. And so it is. Tonight you’re twelve and then suddenly you’re in a holding pattern just past forty. There is no time for delay in personal improvement. Proper preparation for life doesn’t happen overnight.”

Elaine A. Cannon, Young Women General President
Our Mighty Errand,” October 1979 General Conference

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