Single Adults

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“Through Relief Society we practice being disciples of Christ. We learn what He would have us learn, we do what He would have us do, and we become what He would have us become. When we gather with this focus, the work of Relief Society is relevant whatever your circumstance—whether you are 18 or 88, single or married, have children or not, or whether you live in Bountiful, Utah, or Bangalore, India.”

Julie B. Beck, Relief Society General President
What Latter-day Saint Women Do Best: Stand Strong and Immovable,” October 2007 General Conference

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“We…have the opportunity to assist the Lord by providing relief for others, which is the greatest, fastest solution to loneliness and hopelessness and a sure way to obtain the companionship of the Spirit. All we need to do to start offering relief is get on our knees and ask, ‘Who needs my help?’ Every sister—married or single, young or old—is needed in this relief effort…”

Julie B. Beck, Relief Society General President
What Latter-day Saint Women Do Best: Stand Strong and Immovable,” October 2007 General Conference

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“Now, many of you are single. You are students; you are working; you are new to Relief Society. Some of you have been longtime members. Please believe me when I say each of you is valued and needed. Each of you brings love, energy, perspective, and testimony to the work. Your efforts to live close to the Spirit bless us all because you have learned to rely on the Spirit for strength and direction.”

Bonnie D. Parkin, Relief Society General President
Sweet Moments,” October 2005 General Conference

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“If your children are grown and gone; if you are single, divorced, or widowed; don’t let your circumstance dictate your willingness to share your life experiences. Your voice is needed.”

Bonnie D. Parkin, Relief Society General President
Sweet Moments,” October 2005 General Conference

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“Covenant-keeping women with mother hearts know that whether motherhood comes early or late; whether they are blessed with a ‘quiver full’ of children here in mortality or not; whether they are single, married, or left to carry the responsibility of parenthood alone—in holy temples they are ‘endowed with power from on high,’ and with that endowment they received the promised blessings and are ‘persuaded of them, and embraced them.’ ”

Julie B. Beck, First Counselor, Young Women General Presidency
A Mother Heart,” April 2004 General Conference

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“To each of you, no matter your nationality, race, social status, or individual talents, whether you are married, single, or widowed, whether you were born into the Church or are a new convert and the only member of your family, I say, ‘Welcome home!’ The Relief Society is your home, and you are an integral part of a worldwide sisterhood with a divine mission.”

Mary Ellen Smoot, Relief Society General President
For Such a Time As This,” October 1997 General Conference

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“Elder Howard W. Hunter, then a member of the Quorum of the Twelve, [said]: ‘There are impelling reasons for our sisters to plan toward employment also. We want them to obtain all the education and vocational training possible before marriage. If they become widowed or divorced and need to work, we want them to have dignified and rewarding employment. If a sister does not marry, she has every right to engage in a profession that allows her to magnify her talents and gifts.’ If anything, his counsel has become even more relevant in the almost twenty years that have passed as the national economy has made it increasingly difficult for one wage to support a family, as more mothers are left alone to raise their children, and as more women spend lengthy portions of their lives single. He is telling all of us to use the oar of study to prepare ourselves professionally for worthy and rewarding activities, including paid employment.”

Chieko N. Okazaki, First Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Rowing Your Boat,” October 1994 General Conference

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“Through the years, my circumstances have changed. I was a single woman, then the wife of a nonmember, then a partner in a temple sealing, a mother, a mother-in-law and grandmother, and now a widow. I have known the Savior’s love in all of these circumstances. My own faith has been rewarded as I have felt the Savior’s presence and power in my home.”

Chieko N. Okazaki, First Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Strength in the Savior,” October 1993 General Conference

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“As to different plantings: some women work, some do not; some feel awkward in their situations, some don’t; some have good health, others do not; some cry when they hurt, others don’t; some are shy, others aren’t; some are married, some are not. At times our differences seem glaring, almost stark; at times, our similarities cause confusion and discouragement. Yet the Lord created and saw our similarities—the need to have sustenance and rest for our bodies, air to breathe; to love and be loved; to reach for higher realms. The Lord saw our similarities as well as our differences, and he valued both. And from that wisdom, he provided within the Church the Relief Society where gospel principles that can touch the heart and life of each woman—you, me, young, old, married or single as I am—could be taught.”
 
Addie Fuhriman, Relief Society General Board member
Singleness: How Relief Society Can Help,” October 1980 General Conference
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