Small Acts of Charity

Small Acts of Service

linebreak
“Whether we are 8 or 108, we can bring the light of the gospel into our own environment, be it a high-rise apartment in Manhattan, a stilt house in Malaysia, or a yurt in Mongolia. We can determine to look for the good in others and in the circumstances around us. Young and not-so-young women everywhere can demonstrate charity as they choose to use words that build confidence and faith in others.
 
Jean B. Bingham, First Counselor, Primary General Presidency
I Will Bring the Light of the Gospel into My Home,” October 2016 General Conference


linebreak

When we see our own imperfections more clearly, we are less inclined to view others ‘through a glass, darkly.’ We want to use the light of the gospel to see others as the Savior does—with compassion, hope, and charity. The day will come when we will have a complete understanding of others’ hearts and will be grateful to have mercy extended to us—just as we extend charitable thoughts and words to others during this life.

 
Words have surprising power, both to build up and to tear down. We can all probably remember negative words that brought us low and other words spoken with love that made our spirits soar. Choosing to say only that which is positive about—and to—others lifts and strengthens those around us and helps others follow in the Savior’s way.
 
Jean B. Bingham, First Counselor, Primary General Presidency
I Will Bring the Light of the Gospel into My Home,” October 2016 General Conference

linebreak

One of the most significant ways we can develop and demonstrate love for our neighbor is through being generous in our thoughts and words. Some years ago a cherished friend noted, ‘The greatest form of charity may be to withhold judgment.’ That is still true today.
 
Jean B. Bingham, First Counselor, Primary General Presidency
I Will Bring the Light of the Gospel into My Home,” October 2016 General Conference

linebreak

“When children learn how to love and serve others when they are young, they set a pattern of service for the rest of their lives. Often children teach the rest of us that showing love and service doesn’t have to be big and grandiose to be meaningful and make a difference.

“When we reach out in love and service even in the smallest ways, hearts are changed and softened as others feel the love of the Lord.”

Cheryl A. Esplin, First Counselor in the Primary General Presidency

He Asks Us to Be His Hands,” April 2016 General Conference

linebreak

“Expressing charity, or love, purifies and sanctifies our souls, helping us become more like the Savior. Through those small acts of charity, you follow the Savior and you act as instruments in His hands as you help, care, lift, comfort, listen, encourage, nurture, teach, and strengthen the sisters under your care.”

Silvia H. Allred, First Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Charity Never Faileth,” October 2011 General Conference

linebreak

“A great example of unselfish service is the late Mother Teresa of Calcutta, whose vow committed herself and her fellow workers to ‘wholehearted free service to the poorest of the poor.’ She taught that ‘one thing will always secure heaven for us—the acts of charity and kindness with which we have filled our lives.’ ‘We can do no great things,’ Mother Teresa maintained, ‘only small things with great love.’ When this wonderful Catholic servant died, the First Presidency’s message of condolence declared, ‘Her life of unselfish service is an inspiration to all the world, and her acts of Christian goodness will stand as a memorial for generations to come.’ That is what the Savior called losing our lives in service to others.”
 
Dallin H. Oaks, Quorum of the Twelve Apostles
Unselfish Service,” April 2009 General Conference
linebreak

“I fear sometimes we see the Lord’s love only in the big events of our lives; we must also see His love in the smallest of things. Don’t underestimate your ability to share His love through a simple, genuine gesture such as sitting next to another sister and making her feel welcome.”

Bonnie D. Parkin, Relief Society General President
Eternally Encircled in His Love,” October 2006 General Conference

linebreak

“Such simple acts are part of building God’s kingdom. It’s what we do. It’s who we are as sisters of Relief Society. Whether we are serving as president of the Relief Society or as a teacher in Primary or as the Young Women camp director, we are fulfilling our sacred responsibility as Relief Society sisters. When we call to check on an elderly neighbor or provide encouragement and help to a young mother or include another family in our prayers, we are keeping our covenants.”

Kathleen H. Hughes, First Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
In Covenant with Him,” October 2003 General Conference

linebreak

“Some years ago my husband and I visited the eastern sector of Berlin, Germany. Chunks of what was once the infamous wall dividing the citizens of that city were lying about—preserved as a memorial to the triumph of freedom over bondage. Written on one piece of the wall in bold, uneven red letters were these words: ‘Many small people in many small places doing many small things can alter the face of the earth.’ To me that phrase speaks of what each of us—as covenant women—can do to make a difference as we step forward offering our hearts and hands to the Lord by lifting and loving others.”

Anne C. Pingree, Second Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Charity: One Family, One Home at a Time,” October 2002 General Conference

linebreak

“I believe the most important acts of charity are small and simple in nature, eternal in consequence, and are rendered within the walls of our own homes.

“As we try to deal patiently and lovingly every day with fussy babies, challenging teenagers, difficult roommates, less-active spouses, or elderly, disabled parents, we may ask ourselves: ‘Is what I am doing really important? Does it matter or make a difference?’ Dear sisters, what you are doing with your families matters! It matters so very, very much. Daily, each of us learns and relearns at home that charity, the Savior’s pure love, never faileth.”

Anne C. Pingree, Second Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Charity: One Family, One Home at a Time,” October 2002 General Conference

linebreak

“Someday we will all be given final report cards. Maybe we will be graded on how well we have reported each other’s goodness. Every child needs regular reports affirming, ‘You are known. You are valued. You have potential. You are good.’ ”

Gayle M. Clegg, Second Counselor, Primary General Presidency
The Language of Love,” April 2002 General Conference

linebreak

“You don’t have the power to make rainbows or waterfalls, sunsets or roses, but you do have the power to bless people by your words and smiles and your sincere interest in them. Think of it—you carry within you the power to make the world better for someone each day! That is standing as a witness of God.”

Sharon G. Larsen, Second Counselor, Young Women General Presidency
Standing with God,” April 2000 General Conference

linebreak

“So much of our contribution is done in quiet ways, one sister at a time. It has always been so. I think of Mary who bathed Christ’s feet after his hot and dusty journey and then dried his feet with her hair before applying a healing ointment (see John 12:3). I think of Dorcas, sometimes called the Relief Society sister of the New Testament because her life through her good deeds prompted the women to weep and wail at her passing. They pleaded with Peter to restore her to life (see Acts 9:36–39). I think of Helen who works with me at the general Relief Society offices. Untiring, patient, accommodating of all, Helen is a source of peace. She gives me comfort because I know she is always there, even and fine.”
 
Elaine L. Jack, Relief Society General President
Relief Society: A Balm in Gilead,” October 1995 General Conference

linebreak

“Women’s lives are full of small and simple things—discussions about how the day was, visits to schools, laughter at a homemade joke, work in its many forms, playing with children, trips to the doctor, tending the garden, cooking meals, teaching a lesson in church, helping a neighbor, serving a community group, sharing a lesson learned with a sister. Small and simple things that define relationships and build testimonies. Small and simple things that grow strong men and women.”

Elaine L. Jack, Relief Society General President
Charity Never Faileth,” April 1992 General Conference

linebreak

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s