Parents as Teachers

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“Faithful parents are entitled to know how to best teach to meet the needs of their children. As parents seek and act on personal revelation, counsel together, minister and teach the simple principles of the gospel, they will have power to strengthen and protect their families.”

Linda K. Burton, Relief Society General President
The Power, Joy, and Love of Covenant Keeping,” October 2013 General Conference

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“As parents and leaders exemplify and teach respect for others, we confirm in the hearts of our children that each of us is truly a child of God and all are brothers and sisters through eternity. We will focus on the things we have in common—on the qualities of heart that bind the family of God together, rather than on our differences.”

Margaret S. Lifferth, First Counselor, Primary General Presidency
Respect and Reverence,” April 2009 General Conference

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“…While I was born of goodly parents, I was not taught the gospel at home. However, my parents did teach me moral values and ethical conduct. I remember my nonmember father helping me write the first talk I gave at church. The assigned topic was honesty, and instead of quoting the 13th article of faith, we used an example of a man whose nickname was Honest Abe.”

Vicki F. Matsumori, Second Counselor, Primary General Presidency
“A Lesson from the Book of Mormon,” October 2007 General Conference

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“It is this light, the light of the restored gospel—a ‘voice of gladness’—that parents can help their children come to know. The adversary is real, but children can feel the peace and the joy that come as they exercise faith in Jesus Christ. Our children will not experience this light unless we teach them the gospel.”

Coleen K. Menlove, Primary General President
A Voice of Gladness for Our Children,” October 2002 General Conference

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“The Lord directed parents to ‘bring up [their] children in light and truth.’ He also instructed us to teach our children ‘to pray, and to walk uprightly before the Lord,’ and ‘to understand the doctrine of repentance, faith in Jesus Christ, … and of baptism and the gift of the Holy Ghost.’ We help tune their ears, minds, and hearts to recognize ‘a voice of gladness’ and desire to be worthy to obtain eternal joy when we teach the truths of the gospel.

“This is exemplified in the Book of Mormon. Enos’s father taught him ‘in the nurture and admonition of the Lord.’ This great blessing caused Enos to proclaim, ‘Blessed be the name of my God for it.’ Enos then explains, ‘The words which I had often heard my father speak concerning eternal life, and the joy of the saints, sunk deep into my heart.’ ”

Coleen K. Menlove, Primary General President
A Voice of Gladness for Our Children,” October 2002 General Conference

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“Living prophets are clear regarding our sacred duty to teach our children. In a letter issued by the First Presidency, we are instructed ‘to give highest priority to family prayer, family home evening, gospel study and instruction, and wholesome family activities. However worthy and appropriate other demands or activities may be, they must not be permitted to displace the divinely-appointed duties that only parents and families can adequately perform.’ ”

Coleen K. Menlove, Primary General President
A Voice of Gladness for Our Children,” October 2002 General Conference

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“Understanding who these children are and their potential in God’s kingdom can help us have a greater desire to meet the challenges more patiently—more lovingly. The Lord will help us teach our children if we will do all that is within our power. Families are forever, and the Savior wants us to succeed. As we seek the Spirit, we can receive the comfort, guidance, and reassurance we need to fulfill the responsibilities and receive the blessings of parenthood.”

Coleen K. Menlove, Primary General President
A Voice of Gladness for Our Children,” October 2002 General Conference

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“What does it mean to walk uprightly before the Lord? The word upright is defined as honest, honorable, straightforward. Thus, to walk uprightly, our children need to choose to live in an honest, honorable, straightforward manner. Children who understand and live the gospel today can walk with assurance and joy and someday will enter the presence of the Lord, walking uprightly.

“Sometimes it isn’t easy as parents to teach our children. Sometimes we make mistakes. Our children may react with opposition to what we are teaching them. As parents, we should keep our desire to do our best, constantly show our love, and not blame ourselves if our children choose another way.”

Ruth B. Wright, Second Counselor, Primary General Presidency
Teaching Children to Walk Uprightly before the Lord,” April 1994 General Conference

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“Parents are their children’s first and most influential teachers. The responsibility of teaching proper values and sacred truths cannot be successfully delegated to anyone else. We must remember the sanctity of these children; they do not belong to us; they are children of our Father—his spirit children come to earth.”

Joanne B. Doxey, Second Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Strengthening the Family,” October 1987 General Conference

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“One of the major assignments given to parents is to teach their children the gospel. This provides what others have called a ‘value system.’ ”

Dwan J. Young, Primary General President
Prepare to Teach His Children,” October 1983 General Conference

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“Of all the creations of God, men and women are the ones that are to become as he is. We are his children. He has given us a plan, a model, and teachings that will help us gain his attributes.

“We can learn to become like him as we use his ways to teach our children: establishing regular communications with them; listening, guiding, prompting; watching over them always; protecting but not manipulating; allowing them to learn by experience; correcting them in such a way that they learn to obey—not because it is our will, but because they have learned to do what is right to do to grow in wisdom.”

Barbara B. Smith, Relief Society General President
Her Children Arise Up, and Call Her Blessed,” April 1982 General Conference

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“As Latter-day Saint homebuilders, our greatest challenge is to bring up our children in light and truth—to develop the spiritual nature of each family member. Our greatest role is as a teacher.”

Marian R. Boyer, First Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Organize Yourselves,” October 1980 General Conference

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