How to be Virtuous

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“Cherish virtue. Your personal purity is one of your greatest sources of power. When you came to the earth, you were given the precious gift of a body. Your body is the instrument of your mind and a divine gift with which you exercise your agency. This is a gift that Satan was denied, and thus he directs nearly all of his attacks on your body. He wants you to disdain, misuse, and abuse your body. Immodesty, pornography, immorality, tattoos and piercings, drug abuse, and addictions of all kinds are all efforts to take possession of this precious gift—your body—and to make it difficult for you to exercise your agency. Paul asks, ‘Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and that the Spirit of God dwelleth in you?’ ”

Elaine S. Dalton, Young Women General President
Be Not Moved!” April 2013 General Conference

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“I wish every young woman assembled here tonight would know and understand that your beauty—your ‘shine’—does not lie in makeup, gooey cream, or the latest clothing or hairstyles. It lies in your personal purity. When you live the standards and qualify for the constant companionship of the Holy Ghost, you can have a powerful impact in the world. Your example, even the light in your eyes, will influence others who see your ‘shine,’ and they will want to be like you.”

Elaine S. Dalton, Young Women General President
Now Is the Time to Arise and Shine!” April 2012 General Conference

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“What can each of you do to be a guardian of virtue? It starts with believing you can make a difference. It starts with making a commitment.”

Elaine S. Dalton, Young Women General President
Guardians of Virtue,” April 2011 General Conference

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“We must model that which is virtuous and lovely by our personal media choices. We must take care that the media we invite into our homes does not dull the sensitivity to the Spirit, harm relationships with our family and friends, or reveal personal priorities that are inconsistent with gospel principles. By example we can help our children understand that spending long periods of time using the Internet, social media, and cell phones; playing video games; or watching television keeps us from productive activities and valuable interactions with others.”

Mary N. Cook, First Counselor, Young Women General Presidency
Be an Example of the Believers,” October 2010 General Conference

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“What will help you to press forward and continually hold fast to the iron rod? Center your life on the Savior and develop daily habits of righteous living.

“Come to know the Savior and all He has done for you. I find it interesting that when this last group arrived at the tree of life, they fell down. They were humble. They realized that they could not have arrived without the Savior’s help.

“Remember, it is the cleansing power of the Atonement that makes it possible for us to be virtuous.”

Mary N. Cook, First Counselor, Young Women General Presidency
A Virtuous Life—Step by Step,” April 2009 General Conference

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“In order to be virtuous and remain virtuous, you must be true to your divine identity and establish patterns of thought and behavior based on high moral standards. These standards are eternal, and they do not change. They have been taught by prophets of God. In a world filled with relative truth, the Lord’s standards are absolute. They are given to each of us to keep us on the path leading back to the presence of our Heavenly Father and His Son, Jesus Christ.”

Elaine S. Dalton, Young Women General President
Come Let Us Go Up to the Mountain of the Lord,” April 2009 General Conference

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“Virtue begins in the heart and in the mind. It is nurtured in the home. It is the accumulation of thousands of small decisions and actions. Virtue is a word we don’t hear often in today’s society, but the Latin root word virtus means strength. Virtuous women and men possess a quiet dignity and inner strength. They are confident because they are worthy to receive and be guided.”

Elaine S. Dalton, Young Women General President
A Return to Virtue,” October 2008 General Conference

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“I truly believe that one virtuous young woman or young man, led by the Spirit, can change the world, but in order to do so, we must return to virtue. We must engage in strict training… Now is the time to set our course and focus on the finish. A return to virtue must begin individually in our hearts and in our homes.”

Elaine S. Dalton, Young Women General President
A Return to Virtue,” October 2008 General Conference

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“What can each of us do to begin our return to virtue? The course and the training program will be unique to each of us. I have derived my personal training program from instructions found in the scriptures: ‘Let virtue garnish thy thoughts unceasingly.’ ‘Cleave unto [your] covenants.’ ‘Stand … in holy places.’ ‘Lay aside the things of [the] world.’ ‘Believe that ye must repent.’ ‘Always remember him and keep his commandments.’ And ‘if there is anything virtuous, lovely, or of good report or praiseworthy, … seek after these things.’ Now more than ever before, it is time to respond to Moroni’s call to ‘awake, and arise’ and to ‘lay hold upon every good gift, and touch not the evil gift, nor the unclean thing.’ ”

Elaine S. Dalton, Young Women General President
A Return to Virtue,” October 2008 General Conference

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“Sometimes as we walk life’s paths, we want to loiter in dangerous places, thinking that it is fun and thrilling and that we are in control. Sometimes we think we can live on the edge and still maintain our virtue. But that is a risky place to be. As the Prophet Joseph Smith told us, ‘Happiness is the object and design of our existence; and will be the end thereof, if we pursue the path that leads to it; and this path is virtue’.”

Elaine Dalton, Second Counselor, Young Women General Presidency
Stay on the Path,” April 2007 General Conference

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“Modesty is not a matter of being ‘hip.’ It is a matter of the heart and being holy. It is not about being fashionable. It is about being faithful. It is not about being cool. It is about being chaste and keeping covenants. It is not about being popular, but about being pure. Modesty has everything to do with keeping our footing securely on the path of chastity and virtue. It is clear that virtue is a requirement for exaltation…We simply cannot afford to be casual or get too close to the edge. That is dangerous ground for any daughter of God to walk.”

Elaine S. Dalton, Second Counselor, Young Women General Presidency
Stay on the Path,” April 2007 General Conference

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“As you climb the mountains of life, stay on the path of virtue. There will be others to help you—your parents, family members, bishops, advisers, and righteous friends of all ages. And if you are weary or take a wrong turn, change your direction and get back on the path of virtue.

“Always remember that the Savior is there for you. He will enable you to repent, strengthen you, lighten your burdens, dry your tears, comfort you, and continue to help you stay on the path.”

Elaine S. Dalton, Second Counselor, Young Women General Presidency
Stay on the Path,” April 2007 General Conference

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“Virtue and power are found in everyday, ordinary work, in all the daily tasks of caring for our families, and in our regular service to others. Prominence does not equal priority, nor can the world’s paycheck equal that of our Heavenly Father’s, who knows the importance of a woman’s devotion to the salvation of souls.”

Virginia U. Jensen, First Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Ripples,” October 2000 General Conference

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“I think of hope as a modest but very tough everyday virtue, an ordinary but resilient virtue that is both gentle and beautiful. It is an unassuming but powerful force for good that will greatly increase our ability to do good and to be good.”

Chieko N. Okazaki, First Counselor, Relief Society General Presidency
Raised in Hope,” October 1996 General Conference

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